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NEWS FROM THE CLERK OF THE COURT OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE

  • The Courthouse and Coronavirus COVID-19: New Protocols
  • Joint Motion vs. Consent Motion
  • Amended Forms and Functions
By Stephen Swindell and Scott Warner*
 
By Stephen Swindell and Scott Warner*
 
*Stephen Swindell is the Supervisor and Scott Warner is the Operations Manager for
Case Management at the Court of International Trade.

The Courthouse and Coronavirus COVID-19: New Protocols
 
To continue ensuring the safety of Court visitors and employees and in accordance with guidance from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) issued on July 27th, Chief Judge Mark A. Barnett issued an order on August 2nd regarding revised COVID-19 protocols. Included in this order is the requirement that every person entering the Courthouse, regardless of vaccination status, wear a mask or face-covering over their nose and mouth while in common or public areas and to observe physical distancing in accordance with CDC guidance. A copy of this order is available on the Court's website at: www.cit.uscourts.gov under News & Announcements.
 
Joint Motion vs. Consent Motion
 
In the event you find yourself debating whether to file a joint motion or a consent motion, please be mindful of the differences between the two. Joint motions are signed, and deemed filed, by all parties joining in the motion. While consent motions are only signed, and deemed filed, by one party and indicate that the filing party has received consent from the other parties in the case for the court to grant the requested relief. Please note, Rule 7(f) requires the filer to consult the other parties in the case before certain motions are filed, including Rule 6(b) motions for extension of time; Rule 24(a) motions for intervention; motions for preliminary injunction; motions for Rule 56.2(e) hearings; Rule 83 motion for designation of a test case or suspension; and Rule 37(a) motions for an order compelling disclosure or discovery.
 
Amended Forms and Functions
 
To prevent delays with the processing of cases, please ensure that the forms you are filing with the Court are up-to-date. In the past several years, a dozen forms within the Rules of the Court have been amended, including: Form 1 1581(a) Summons; Form 2 1581(b) Summons; Form 3 1581(c) Summons; Form 4 General Summons; Form 5 Information Statement; Form 9 Stipulated Judgment on Agreed Statement of Facts; Form 10 Application for Admission; Form 20 Subpoena; Form 21 Bill of Costs; and Form 24 Order for Statutory Injunction Upon Consent. The most current versions of these forms can be found on the Court's website at: www.cit.uscourts.gov under Rules and Forms.

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